8-year-old boy, who was paralyzed in a mass shooting in Highland Park, suffers from short-term memory loss

An 8-year-old boy who was shot and paralyzed in the mass shooting in Highland Park on July 4 is now suffering from short-term memory and cognitive loss as he struggles to adjust to his new life.

Cooper Roberts was shot in the abdomen by the shooter and was paralyzed from the waist down when the bullet severed his spine, leaving him little chance of walking again.

A recent statement from Cooper’s family, who have been open about his struggles, said his rehabilitation team at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago “sees certain patterns that may indicate cognitive loss.”

His family says on their GoFundMe for Cooper that he didn’t talk enough early in his recovery for them to notice the issues, but they become clearer over time.

“Therapists are seeing short-term memory loss, word retrieval issues, and acuity loss around many more skills,” the statement said.

“They are doing a full neurological and psychological evaluation this week and are working on new therapies” to help the suffering boy.

Cooper Roberts, pictured before the shooting, is struggling to come to terms with the new reality of his life as he struggles to recover from his injuries, his family have said.

Cooper's latest photo shows him in his beloved Milwaukee Brewers jersey

Cooper’s latest photo shows him in his beloved Milwaukee Brewers jersey

Roberts, 8, pictured using a standing wheelchair for the first time

Roberts, 8, pictured using a standing wheelchair for the first time

Cooper and his French bulldog were together this month for the first time since his injury in July

Cooper and his French bulldog were together this month for the first time since his injury in July

The family also said Cooper’s rehabilitation team is “working with us to consider Cooper’s long-term needs once he is home.”

These needs include “the assistive technologies he needs to help him with daily living and the home features needed for a child who will grow up with a pediatric spinal cord injury.”

They say the whole ordeal is ‘overwhelming to consider’.

The family has provided consistent updates on Cooper’s heartbreaking situation since the shooting and said he feels “desperate, sad and angry as the reality of his life sets in”.

“Cooper is in constant pain. It’s agonizing to see,’ his family wrote. “He still has internal damage – wounds that are slow to heal.”

Cooper’s family said he began to understand the reality of his new life as he underwent grueling physical and occupational therapy, while maneuvering around a number of life tubes inserted into his body.

“He starts asking things like, ‘What am I going to do at recess? “Wrote his family.

They said the ‘mental and emotional anguish’ of his experience and the realization of what he has lost are beginning to weigh on the boy.

Due to the severity of his spinal cord injury, doctors have now confirmed that Cooper is unlikely to walk again.

It was initially believed Cooper had been shot in the chest, but doctors at Highland Park Hospital said the bullet entered his abdomen.

“The bullet entered his upper abdomen, injuring the left lobe of his liver, his esophagus near his stomach, his abdominal aorta and exited through his back, injuring his spinal cord,” the doctors said.

The Roberts family posing for a group photo.  Bottom left, twin brother Luke, Cooper on the right, dad Jason behind and mother Keely on the far right.  Her two older sisters are also seen

The Roberts family posing for a group photo. Bottom left, twin brother Luke, Cooper on the right, dad Jason behind and mother Keely on the far right. Her two older sisters are also seen

Cooper's family shared this photo of him giving a thumbs up from a wheelchair

Cooper’s family shared this photo of him giving a thumbs up from a wheelchair

Cooper plays on a table in the hospital as he learns to live again after his paralysis

Cooper plays on a table in the hospital as he learns to live again after his paralysis

“It’s very difficult to convince Cooper that he will be happy again,” his family said. “He’s an eight-year-old boy who feels hopeless, sad and angry as the reality of his life sets in.”

His family said they shared the depths of Cooper’s struggle to show the world what really happens to shooting victims.

“There are layers and layers of cruelty to being shot by a sniper. Most people do not witness the grueling consequences of surviving these devastating injuries, physical and emotional,” they wrote.

Cooper’s twin brother, Luke, and his mother, Keely, were also injured in the massacre, which left seven people dead and more than 40 injured.

Luke was also hospitalized with shrapnel in his lower body, but was released after medics removed some of the debris, although they were unable to remove it all.

Keely suffered gunshot wounds to her legs and feet and underwent at least two surgeries herself. The family said they were so upset by Cooper’s condition that they insisted on being released from the hospital early – against doctors’ recommendations – to be with their son in children’s hospital.

Cooper and his twin brother Luke “loved the parade” and had attended the event before. They are “best friends, partners in crime”, their older sister said.

Victims of the 4th of July shooting in Highland Park

Seven people were killed and more than 40 injured when Robert Crimo fired an AR-15-style rifle into a crowd during a July 4 parade in Highland Park, just north of Chicago, Illinois.

The seven killed are:

Stephen Straus, 88 – Katherine Goldstein, 64 – Jacki Sundheim, 63 – Nicholas Toledo Zaragoza, 78 – Eduardo Uvaldo, 69 – husband and wife Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37.

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37, were both killed in the massacre.  Their two-year-old son, Aiden, was removed from his father's body

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37, were both killed in the massacre. Their two-year-old son, Aiden, was removed from his father’s body

Nicolas Toledo, 76, did not want to attend the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois on Monday, his granddaughter told The New York Times.

Jacki Sundheim, a longtime staff member of North Shore Congregation Israel, was shot and killed when a fire broke out during the July 4 parade in Highland Park, Illinois.

Nicolas Toledo, 76, a grandfather from Mexico, and Jacki Sondheim, 63, a longtime staff member of North Shore Congregation Israel, were both killed in the massacre.

Irina and Kevin McCarthy were the parents of a two-year-old boy, Aiden, who was orphaned following the shooting. The boy was pulled from under his father’s body by onlookers.

Nicolas Toledo was the first identified victim. He was a Mexican grandfather visiting his family in Highland Park. His family said his blood splashed on them when he was shot in the head while sitting in his wheelchair.

Toledo hadn’t wanted to attend the parade, his granddaughter told The New York Times, but his family convinced him to attend.

Another victim, Jacki Sundheim, was a long-time teacher at the North Shore Congregation Israel Synagogue. She is survived by husband Bruce and daughter Leah, The Times of Israel reported.

“There are not enough words to express the depth of our grief for Jacki’s death,” the synagogue said in a statement.

Katherine Goldstein (left) was among those killed in the Highland Park Parade mass shooting on July 4

Katherine Goldstein (left) was among those killed in the Highland Park Parade mass shooting on July 4

Steve Straus, 88, was among seven people killed in the July 4 parade massacre in Highland Park

Eduardo Uvaldo died on Wednesday.  The family said he was shot in the arm and the back of the head

Steve Straus, 88 (left) was among seven people killed in the July 4 parade massacre in Highland Park. Eduardo Uvaldo, 65 (right) died on Wednesday. The family said he was shot in the arm and the back of the head

Eduardo Uvaldo died days after the shooting from gunshot wounds to the arm and head. His wife, Maria, was hit in the head by fragments and his grandson was shot in the arm, but both recovered.

Victim Katherine Goldstein’s daughter, Cassie, described how her mother was shot in the chest and fell dead in front of her.

He shot her in the chest and she fell. And I knew she was dead,’ Cassie told NBC Nightly News after the shoot, ‘So I just told him I loved him, but I couldn’t stop because he was still shooting. on everyone next to me.”